THE RIGHT TO VOTE: Countries where under-18s can vote

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Over 16:

Argentina
Austria
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Brazil
Cuba
Dominican Republic (married persons)
Ecuador
Germany (local elections only) 
Guernsey  (self-governing British Crown Dependency)
Hungary (married persons),
Isle of Man (self-governing British Crown Dependency)
Jersey (self-governing British Crown Dependency)
Malta (local elections only as of 2015)
Montenegro (if employed)
Nicaragua
Philippines (for municipal elections and married persons)
Serbia (if employed; 18 otherwise)
Scotland (only for the Scottish independence referendum in 2014)
Slovenia (if employed; 18 otherwise)
Switzerland (local elections only). 

Over 17:

East Timor
Indonesia
North Korea
Sudan
Seychelles
Israel (local elections only)
United States (for some primaries) 

Proposals to lower voting age: 

Norway: In 2007, the Norwegian Ombudsperson's office has argued for lowering the age of voting to 16 at local level. The government has established that municipalities can apply to join the project, with 126 out of 430 having applied so far. 

Malta: In 2013, Prime Minister Joseph Muscat hinted that the voting age (currently 16 for local elections only) could be lowered in the future even for general elections, European Parliament elections and referenda.

Iran: In 2007 the voting age was increased from 15 to 18. But in 2009 the Council of Ministers of Iran approved a decree to reduce the voting age once again to 15. It currently remains, however, at 18. 
 

If you know of a proposal in your country to lower the voting age below 18, please let us know by emailing us at info@crin.org

Countries

    Please note that these reports are hosted by CRIN as a resource for Child Rights campaigners, researchers and other interested parties. Unless otherwise stated, they are not the work of CRIN and their inclusion in our database does not necessarily signify endorsement or agreement with their content by CRIN.