PHILIPPINES: Senate body to review anti-child abuse laws

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Summary: Following recent allegations of child abuse on prime-time television, the Senate committee on youth, women and family relations will review existing anti-child abuse laws in the Philippines.

[12 April 2011] - The Senate committee on youth, women and family relations will review laws on children's rights when Congress resumes session on May 9 to ensure that existing rules are relevant to the times, Senator Pia S. Cayetano said Tuesday. 

This comes after Willing Willie host Willie Revillame came under fire for allegedly compelling a six-year old boy to simulate a “macho dancer” routine in exchange of cash reward in the show. 

"We have so many talent shows and contests where kids are made to dress and gyrate like sexy dancers thinking that it's 'cute' or 'funny.' But in gender-sensitive cities like Davao, the mayor has long banned the swimsuit portion in their annual Mutya ng Dabaw search,” Ms. Cayetano said in a statement.

“There's no reason why we can't adopt this example across the country and show the same respect for both women and children, not only in talent shows but also on TV, advertisements and all forms of media."

She added that although there are existing laws such as Republic Act (RA) 7610, or the act providing for stronger deterrence and special protection against child abuse, exploitation and discrimination, and RA 9262, or the Anti-violence Against Women and Children Act, Congress must ensure that laws are “applicable to various circumstances.”

Just last Saturday, Mr. Revillame announced that his show will go off-air for two weeks following the withdrawal of advertisements of big companies.

 

Further Information:

pdf: http://www.crin.org/docs/Noemi M. Gonzales

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