Regional Workshop on Play Skills and Techniques to Build Children's Resilience

Summary: The 4 day workshops aims to increase
participants awareness and understanding on
play techniques and skills while working with
children and develop understanding on local
and traditional play techniques for
strengthening community based child centres
psychosocial support techniques, structures
and mechanisms.

SCS Regional programme for South and Central Asia is happy to confirm the new dates for the "Region Workshop on Play Skills and Techniques to Build Children's Resilience" from 5th - 8th September 05, Kathmandu, Nepal.


Save the Children is fighting for the rights of Children and bases its work on the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. Several articles in CRC address violence against children. In Article 19 State parties are obliged to take all appropriate legislative, administrative, social and educational measures to protect children from all forms of physical or mental violence, injury and abuse, neglect or negligent treatment, maltreatment or exploitation, including sexual abuse. Freedom of expression in Article 13 and the right to be heard in Article 12 are of particular importance when a child wants to speak up about sexual abuse and exploitation. Children who report violence and other distress have the right to be taken seriously, to be met with respect and to receive assistance. Good channels for reporting and effective disclosure procedures are essential measures for the protection of girls and boys against sexual exploitation and abuse including other violations. Children affected by violence, disasters and emergencies affects child's basic right to life and development as stated in Article 6. The article 31 promotes that the child has the right to leisure, play and participation in cultural and artistic activities. Play is the child's natural medium of communication. It is the most appropriate method in which to address the psychosocial needs of children. Play is a safe environment in which the child is able to express herself[1] naturally using play as communication, and offering the child a form of self-therapy (Oaklander, 1988:160). Play is an interactive medium of helping children heal themselves. It is also a universal language among children. Regardless of children's culture, language or historical background, children are able to play. Life crises are inevitable. When children are provided with opportunities to play they are better able to make sense of life crises. Resilience in its simplest form is the ability to survive and cope in a meaningful and growth enhancing way with life crises. Play allows children to make sense of and connect with their world. When children are traumatized by death, abuse, abandonment, family mental illness and other life crises, their connection with their world is often restricted or damaged. In most cultures games exist. The educational benefits of play is often highlighted, but there also exists a very strong healing element to play. In therapy the term "third element" is often used to describe play techniques used to help the child find methods of self-healing through play. Play is non-threatening and allows the child an opportunity to normalize their feelings. The child is able to exercise control over her play and this in itself offers a sense of relief to the traumatized child trying to make sense of the uncertainty in the traumatic situation. When play techniques are used to help children express their feelings and give expression to these feelings in ways that does not hurt the child or others the child becomes better able to cope with difficult feelings in the future. Particular play skills/techniques offer children an opportunity to express feelings and express life views. Play creates an environment in which children become more aware of themselves, their needs, their self-worth, their feelings and their coping skills. By helping children access coping structures and self-nurturing abilities, they will be more resilient, better able to cope within their environment and deal with trauma in a healthy manner. Once children feel listened to and are able to communicate in their natural language of play they are able to let the adults in their lives know what they need. Play offers traumatized children the opportunity to make healthy contact with their environment, access the necessary resources both internal and external for coping. The 4 days workshops aims to increase participants awareness and understanding on play techniques and skills while working with children and develop understanding on local and traditional play techniques for strengthening community based child centres psychosocial support techniques, structures and mechanisms. The workshop will be facilitated by Liesl Jewitt, from South Africa. All the in-country costs (logistics cost, cost of food, venue and material etc.) will be borne by Save the Children Sweden.


Please confirm your participation to: Fahmida Jabeen, Regional Consultant Violence against Children Email: shoma_fahmida@yahoo.com with a copy to Anju Pradhan: anju@savethechildren.org.np For more information, contact: Ravi Karkara, Regional Programme Manager Save the Children Sweden, c/o SCUK OSCAR Regional Programme for South & Central Asia Lalithpur, GPO Box: 5850, Kathmandu, Nepal Email: ravikarkara@savethechildren.org.np Website: http://www.savethechildren.org.np

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